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Indigenous Peoples of North Carolina: Sappony and Waccamaw-Siouan

A Bibliography of Sources Available in the North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Sappony Resources

Books

Lougee, George. “Origin of the Person County Indians.” In Madeleine Hall Eaker, ed.,The Heritage of Person County [Vol. 1]. Winston-Salem, N.C.: Hunter Publishing Co., 1981, pp. 5-7. C971.73 H54p

Ross, Thomas E. American Indians in North Carolina: Geographic Interpretations. Southern Pines, N.C.: Karo Hollow Press, 1999. See chapter ten, “Indians of Person County,” pp. 189-198. C970.01 R826a


Journal Articles

"The Indians of Person County." The State, vol. 16 no. 37 (12 February 1949), pp. 3-4, 20. C917.05 S79


Newspaper Articles

Lougee, George. “Origin of Indians of Person County Still Veiled in Mystery.”Durham Morning Herald (Durham, N.C.), 24 April 1977. North Carolina Collection Clipping File, 1976-1989, reel 14, p. 246. CR917 N87

Assis, Claudia. "Museum Documents Sappony's History / History Traces the Person County Native Americans to the Time of John Smith." Herald-Sun (Durham, N.C.), 13 May 2002. C071 D96h1

Archival Resources

Jill Hemming Collection, 1994-1995

While working on her M.A. in Folklore from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jill Hemming received a Documentation Project Grant from the Folklife Section of the North Carolina Arts Council to document and photograph quilts crafted by women of the Waccamaw Siouan Tribe of North Carolina. Hemming conducted the survey of Waccamaw Siouan quilts in Columbus and Bladen counties, N.C., 1994-1995. Each quilt is documented on a form with corresponding visual representation on color slides. As far as possible, each quilt is identified by quilt owner; the quilt maker; the quilt maker's spouse, children, and parents; the quilter (if different than the quilt maker); and the materials, dimensions, and pattern of the quilt. The quilts of Elizabeth Graham Jacobs (Lee) are particularly well represented. The oldest quilt documented was made circa 1919. The rest range from the 1940s to the 1990s.

Waccamaw-Siouan Resources

Books, Theses, and Government Reports

Aldred, Jo E. No More Cigar Store Indians: Ethnographic and Historical Representations By and Of the Waccamaw-Siouan Peoples and their Socioeconomic, Legal, and Political Consequences. M. A. Thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1992. 58 pp. C378 UO2 1992 ALDRED, J.E.

Lerch, Patricia. "Articulatory Relationships: The Waccamaw Struggle Against Assimilation." In James Peacock and James Sabella, eds., Sea and Land: Cultural and Biological Adaptations in the Southern Coastal Plain. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1988, pp. 76-91. Cataloged in the North Carolina Collection under Lerch, "Research Papers on the Waccamaw Sioux." C970.03 L614r

Lerch, Patricia. "Powwows, Parades and Social Drama Among the Waccamaw Sioux." In Pamela R. Frese, ed., Celebrations of Identity: Multiple Voices in American Ritual Performance. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1993, pp. 75-92. Cataloged in the North Carolina Collection under Lerch, "Research Papers on the Waccamaw Sioux." C970.03 L614r

Lerch, Patricia. "State-Recognized Indians of North Carolina, Including a History of the Waccamaw Sioux." In J. Anthony Paredes, ed., Indians of the Southeastern United States in the Late 20th Century. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1992, pp. 44-71. Cataloged in the North Carolina Collection under Lerch, "Research Papers on the Waccamaw Sioux." C970.03 L614r

Native American Rights Fund, compiler. Waccamaw Siouan Tribe of North Carolina: A Collection of Historic Documents. Boulder, Colo.: Native American Rights Fund, [1978]. Includes "Waccamaw Indians History" by James Evan Alexander; remarks of Hon. Norris Poulson, representative from California, 6 February 1950 on "Lost Tribe of Indians in North Carolina" (published in the Congressional Record, p. A886); documents related to HR 7153, a bill regarding Waccamaw Indian land in North Carolina, 1950; and a brief history of the Waccamaw Siouan tribe by an unidentified author. C970.03 W11n

Ross, Thomas E. American Indians in North Carolina: Geographic Interpretations. Southern Pines, N.C.: Karo Hollow Press, 1999. See chapter six, “Waccamaw-Siouan Indians," pp. 137-148. C970.01 R826a

Sykes, Robert D. "Origin of the Waccamaw Indians." [n.p., 1975?]. 4 pp. Unpublished typescript. Cp970.03 S98o

Waccamaw Siouan Development Association, Inc. "Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe." Bolton, N.C., 1977. 12 p. Cp970.03 W11w

Waccamaw Siouan Quilters: Piecing the Past and Future. [Bolton, N.C. : Waccamaw Siouan Development Association, 1998?]. 20 pp. Cp970.03 W11h

 

Journal Articles

Hemming, Jill. "Waccamaw-Siouan Quilts: A Model for Studying Native American Quilting." Uncoverings: Research Papers of the American Quilt Study Group vol. 18 (1997), pp. 189-211.

Lerch, Patricia. "Pageantry, Parade, and Indian Dancing: The Staging of Identity Among the Waccamaw Sioux." Museum Anthropology, vol. 16 no. 2 (June 1992), pp. 27-34. Cataloged in the North Carolina Collection under Lerch, "Research Papers on the Waccamaw Sioux.", C970.03 L614r

Lerch, Patricia B. and Susan Bullers. "Powwows as Identity Markers: Traditional or Pan-Indian?" Human Organization vol. 55, no. 4 (Winter 1996), pp. 390-397.

 

Newspaper Articles

Eury, Marvin. “Cabarrus Land First Held By Siouan Indians.” Independent Weekly(Raleigh, N.C.), n.d. Filed under Siouan Indians in “Indians of North Carolina” clipping file, North Carolina Collection. C970.01 I39

Beach, Clarke. “Congress Asked to Recognize Waccamaw Indians in State.” Daily Times-News (Burlington, N.C.), 18 April 1950. “Indians of North Carolina” clipping file, North Carolina Collection. C970.01 I39

“Congress Hears of Lost N.C. Tribe.” Asheville Citizen (Asheville, N.C.), 27 April 1950. “Indians of North Carolina” clipping file, North Carolina Collection. C970.01 I39

Lanier, Joe. "Pow Wow Time in Buckhead." Duplin Times-Progress Sentinel(Kenansville, N.C.), 24 July 1975. “Indians of North Carolina” clipping file, North Carolina Collection. C970.01 I39

Gold, Scott. "Powwow Blends Cultures of the Past with Modern America." Star-News(Wilmington, N.C.), 17 October 1993. C071 S792w

Fuhrer, Diane. “Waccamaw Siouans: Annual Powwow Starts Today; Drumbeat of Heritage Sounds at Buckhead.” Morning Star (Wilmington, N.C.), 15 October 1999.C071 S792w

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