Skip to Main Content

HIST 241: History of Latinos in the United States

What are primary sources?

Primary sources are materials directly related to a topic by time or participation. These materials include letters, speeches, diaries, newspaper articles from the time, oral history interviews, documents, photographs, artifacts, or anything else that provides firsthand accounts about a person or event.

Guides

Finding Primary Sources

This local guide provides assistance in pursuing research using primary sources, especially those we have available here in several formats: paper, republication, microfilm, and electronic. The database below helps identifies primary source repositories around the world.

ArchiveGrid

ArchiveGrid serves as a single point of entry that provides online access to descriptions of archival collections held by thousands of libraries, museums, historical societies, and archives worldwide.

Oral Histories

New Roots: Voices from Carolina del Norte (UNC-Chapel Hill)

This is a a digital archive that contains the oral histories of Latin American migrants in North Carolina and the experiences of North Carolinians that have worked for the integration of new settlers into this southern state.

Voces Oral History Project (UT Austin)

The Voces Oral History Project documents and creates a better awareness of the contributions of U.S. Latinos and Latinas of the WWII, Korean War and Vietnam War generations.

Oral History Interviews (University of Notre Dame)

Oral history interviews are a major component of the Institute for Latino Studies’ effort to document and preserve Latino history. These interviews offer scholars and students “first person” narratives of American culture and society

Latina/o Diaspora in the Americas Project (University of Florida)

Am archive of 100+ oral histories dedicated to creating space for Latina/os to share their historical experiences related to identity, immigration reform, labor conditions, education, and civil rights.

Oral histories and more:

North American Immigrant Letters, Diaries and Oral Histories

North American Immigrant Letters, Diaries and Oral Histories includes 2,162 authors and approximately 100,000 pages of information, so providing a unique and personal view of what it meant to immigrate to America and Canada between 1800 and 1950. Composed of contemporaneous letters and diaries, oral histories, interviews, and other personal narratives, the series provides a rich source for scholars in a wide range of disciplines.
 

  • Last Updated: Sep 27, 2021 9:06 AM
  • URL: https://guides.lib.unc.edu/c.php?g=626979