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INLS 501: Information Resources and Services: Readings

  • Some articles on this reading list are required and some are supplemental (not required, but read them if you are interested in the topic). They are designed to complement the work we are doing in class and familiarize you with the library literature for reference services and sources.
  • The primary textbook is 
    • Kay Ann Cassell, Uma Hiremath. Reference and Information Services : An Introduction. Fourth edition., Chicago : ALA Neal-Schuman, an imprint of the American Library Association, 2018. https://go.unc.edu/cassell-2018.
  • Class PowerPoint presentations are on the home tab of this guide.

January Readings | February Readings | March Readings | April Readings | Topic Guide Resources

Additional Readings

 Additional Readings

Outreach & Programmng:

Serving the Homeless (Required):

Serving the Military

Assessment:

Questions

Ethics

Future

Google Search Tips

Government Documents & Reference

Question:

  • How would you answer patron questions in the Smith article?

April 2022 Readings

Read for April 6, 2022 • Assessment

Questions

The authors pose two research questions. How are they answered? 

  1. How is the service used? Are there any trends that can be discovered?
  2. Is the current service model adequate for the service?

What do you think of these broad questions? Are they useful in other scenarios? 

What other questions might you ask?

For April 11, Vocational Awe

Questions

  • How does Ettarh define vocational awe?
  • How does it manifest?
  • It’s depressing! Why does Ettarh write this article?! 

 

Read / watch by: April 18, 2022. Serving People with Disabilities:

Questions

  • What do you think patrons in the videos for serving people with disabilities would like librarians to know?
  • What reference techniques do you see demonstrated in the videos? What techniques should have been used?

March Readings

Readings for March, 2022

Read by March 28

Ethics

American Library Association. “Ethics and Social Media Q&A.” Tools, Publications & Resources, 19 May 2017, https://www.ala.org/tools/ethics/socialmediaqa.

---. “Professional Ethics.” Tools, Publications & Resources, 19 May 2017, https://www.ala.org/tools/ethics.

Ferguson, Stuart, et al. “Beyond Codes of Ethics: How Library and Information Professionals Navigate Ethical Dilemmas in a Complex and Dynamic Information Environment.” International Journal of Information Management, vol. 36, no. 4, Aug. 2016, pp. 543–56.

Questions:

  • What surprised you in the ethical dilemmas (Appendix I)?
  • Why do we need codes of ethics?
  • Why do we protect patrons' privacy? Should we always protect their privacy?
  • Why do librarians object to censorship? 

Open Access

Piled Higher and Deeper (PHD Comics). Open Access Explained! 2012, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5rVH1KGBCY

Wright, Sarah Towner, LibGuides: Open Access and Scholarly Communications: Busting OA Myths. https://guides.lib.unc.edu/open-access-and-scholarly-communications/myths. Accessed 22 Mar. 2022.

Questions

  • What was new to you in the video or reading?
  • How much do you think an annual subscription costs to the International Journal of Information Management -- where the Ferguson article is from?
  • How does Open Access relate to Ethics?

Readings for the next class start here.

For March 30

Take this fun “how news is made” quiz https://go.unc.edu/kenan-news-quiz from the News Literacy Project.

Questions

  • What surprised you?
  • What would you tell your mom or your roommate about what you learned?

Readings on Topic Guide Basics March 9, 2022

Questions

For the Duncan article:

  • What is the purpose of a guide?
  • How can this kind of guide be used beyond an academic setting - archives, public libraries, etc.?
  • Have you thought about writing for the web before? 
  • Start to think about a guide you could create - for any topic, any situation, any type of library.

For the Skaggs article:

  • What’s an example of good web writing? Why? 
  • Revisit the database you evaluated & presented on Feb. 21.
  • Consider how you’d write a 20-35 word description of that database.

Buy or borrow Steve Krug’s book: Don’t Make Me Think – any edition. Available:

  • On Reserve at Davis, TK5105.888 .K78 2006
  • Three additional copies at UNC Libraries
  • Cheap at Biblio.com (less than $5)
  • Read chapters 1-3, Don't make me think; How we really use the Web; Billboard design 101; and chapter 5: Omit needless words. (if you can only read one chapter, read chapter 5).

Read by 3/21/22. Outreach & Programming:

Questions:

  • Is outreach necessary? Why or why not?
  • How did the outreach session that you attended match with the readings? How did they differ?

Read by: 03.23.22. LibGuides Training (Required)

  • Krug, Steve. Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability. Any edition. Read chapters 1-3, Don't make me think; How we really use the Web; Billboard design 101; and chapter 5: Omit needless words. (if you can only read one chapter, read chapter 5).
    • On Reserve at Davis, TK5105.888 .K78 2006
    • Three additional copies at UNC Libraries
    • Cheap at Biblio.com (less than $5)
  • Making Guides Accessible - LibGuides at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Topic Guide Resources

Topic Guide Resources

UNC LibGuides login on Sakai under Topic Guide Resources / Login Information for LibGuides

About LibGuides

Nora's Recommended Links

About Web Design

  • Krug, Steve. Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability. Any edition. Read chapters 1-3, Don't make me think; How we really use the Web; Billboard design 101; and chapter 5: Omit needless words(if you can only read one chapter, read chapter 5).
    • On Reserve at Davis, TK5105.888 .K78 2006
    • Three additional copies at UNC Libraries
    • Cheap at Biblio.com (less than $5)
  • Making Guides Accessible - LibGuides at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

About Writing

February Readings

Readings for February, 2022

Read by: 02.02.22. Virtual / Chat Reference (Required):

Questions beyond the 5Ws, H & M, for Hamer:

  • Describe the Codes used for the various aspects of the analysis: Heading, Body, Signature
  • How do these Codes match the RUSA guidelines for providing reference?
  • Have you ever responded to an email service request? How have you addressed the sender?
  • Hamer notes that neither RUSA nor IFLA guidelines mention the value of unconscious bias in reference interactions. How might you address that based on Hamer's research?

Questions beyond the 5Ws, H & M, for Radford:

  • What types of "relationship building" does Radford discuss?
  • Which of these relationship building traits appeals to you? Why?
  • Which relationship building trait surprised you? Why?

Read by: 02.09.22. Newspapers (Required):

Questions

  • 5Ws, H & What's Missing?
  • What database did they want to use but couldn't? 
  • What do they mean by “overlap” in LexisNexis and Factiva?
  • One of the items to consider when evaluating databases is "relation to similar content." What does that mean in the context of this article?

Read by: 02.09.22. Searching Newspapers (Required):

Read by: 02.14.22. How to Search (Required):

Questions:

  • Why do you think it's important to know about records, fields, and indexes?
  • Was there something that so excited you that you wanted to try it immediately? What?
  • Apply something in these readings to the database you will be presenting on Feb. 21.

Read by: 02.16.22. Instruction 

Questions:

  • What are some of Bell's teaching principles? How might they apply to your short database evaluation presentation?
  • Do you prefer to learn from a video or from reading a chapter like Bell? Is this true in every situation or just some? Consider some examples.
  • Cook asks: "How can I teach this material to students so that it best facilitates their retention of the information being presented?" What are some of her recommendations? Which of these had you seen before? Which were new to you? 

Read by: 02.23.22 Serving BIPOC Patrons

Questions beyond the 5Ws, How, & What’s Missing

  • What are some ways libraries can improve services to Hispanic students?  
  • Is the Bladek article relevant only for academic libraries? Why or why not?
  • What kind of teen programming does Udell describe?
  • Is the Udell article relevant only for teens? Why or why not?

For Further Information

Read by: 02.28.22 Public Library Resources 

  • Genealogy: Keaton, KYmberly. “23 AND WE.” Library Journal, vol. 146, no. 10, Oct. 2021, pp. 28–31. Library & Information Science Source.
  • Readers Advisory: Welch, Lynne and Laurel Tarulli. “RA Training: Getting Started with Readers’ Advisory.” Reference & User Services Quarterly, vol. 52, 2013, pp. 191-96. 

January Readings

Readings for January, 2022

Read by: 01.12.22. Providing Reference (Required):


Read by: 01.19.22. Finding Books in Libraries (Required):

  • Upson, Matt et al. Read chapter 2 ”How Information Is Organized and Found : The Basics" in Information Now : A Graphic Guide to Student Research, University of Chicago Press, 2015, pp. 25-37. https://ares.lib.unc.edu/ares/ares.dll/plink?14406F82. in Sakai & on reserve at SILS. ZA3075 .U67 2015.
  • ---. Read chapter 3 ”Searching and Library Catalogs : Understanding the Hunt for Information" in Information Now : A Graphic Guide to Student Research, University of Chicago Press, pp. 39-52. https://ares.lib.unc.edu/ares/ares.dll/plink?14407077. in Sakai & on reserve at SILS. ZA3075 .U67 2015.

Questions:

  • What did you already know about finding books in libraries?
  • What was new to you?
  • Have you learned / implemented any changes in your searching since reading these chapters? 

Read by: 01.24.22. Reference Interview (Required):

Questions:

  • What are the elements of the reference interview?
  • What behaviors should be avoided and why?
  • Why can’t users just tell us what they want?!
  • What's missing?

Read by: 01.26.22. Reference Practice (Required):

Questions:

  • What is your favorite reference question example? Why?
  • Users may sacrifice content for convenience. Is this true for all users? How can we address this?
  • What is a referral? Why would you use it?

Read by: 01.31.22. Evaluating Sources (Required):

  • Bell, Suzanne S. Chapter 12: ”Evaluating Databases" in Librarian's Guide to Online Searching, Libraries Unlimited, 2015 fourth edition, pp. 253-68. on reserve at Davis. ZA4460 .B45 2015. Purchase a used copy from Biblio (or anywhere).

Questions:

  • List 5-6 elements to consider when evaluating or testing databases
  • What’s missing in Bell’s chapter on evaluating databases?
  • At the end of the chapter, Bell says: “do not feel compelled to work through every point mentioned in this chapter.” Why does she say that? Which elements resonate most with you?
  • We will crowdsource a Source Evaluation form in class, which we'll use for the rest of class.